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BULLETIN 

American 

Association of Commerce and Trade. 

Corporation. 

Founded in 1903 by American citizens 
for the promotion of Commerce and Trade. 

EQUITABLE BUILDING 
BERLIN, GERMANY 



NOVEMBER 1914 



CABLr. ADDRESS CABLE CODES 

■•A.VIASCOT" WESTERN UNION 

TELEPHONE: ZE.NTRUM 8422 A. n. C. LIEBER'S COMMERCIAL 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2015 



https://archive.org/details/bulletinOOamer_0 



American 

Association of Commerce and Trade 

roXTKBXD 1908, OFFIOES EQinTABLE BUILDINa, FRTEDRIOHSTR. »/«). 

BULLETIN 

NOVEMBER 1914 



I 



The Equitable Bnilding 
HEADQUARTERS OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 
OF COMMERCE AND TRADE IN BERLIN 



II 



HOLLAND AMERICA LINE 

Weekly Passenger Service between Rotterdam and New York 
via Boulogne sur Msr. Modern Twinscrew Steamers of 12531-24170 Reg. Tons. 
Triple Screw S. S- STATENDAM 35000 Reg. Tons. 45000 Tons Displacement. 
For all information and passage tickets apply to the Holland Anerlca Line at Retterdui or 

AL PETERS, UNTER den linden 6, BERLIN 



From BERLIN to LONDON via 
HOOK OF HOLLAND - HARWICH (THE SHORT CUT) 

19 HOURS " ' 

Isl. Class M. 83.0O — II nd CI. M. 54.80 — II nd C\. and 1st CI. boat M. 6130 



For tickets and freo resarvalion ol seats in the cars, as well as berths on Mia boat, apply to 
A|_ PETERS O/ficial Ticket Office Great Eattem 

6 UNTER DEN LINDEN 6 Railway & HoUdndische Eisenbahn 



HOTEL ADLON 

• BERLIN 



D □ □ 
D □ 
□ 



GEBR. FRIEDI^ANDCR 

JEWELLERS, GOLD AND SILVERSMITHS 

BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT TO 
HIS MAJESTY THE GERMAN EMPEROR 
HER MAJESTY THE GERMAN EMPRESS 

BERLIN W., 4a UNTER DEN LINDEN 



□ □ □ 

□ a 
a 



BERLIN: 118 LEIPZIGEB 8TRASSE 

Branches; Cologne, Dresden, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich, Vienna, New York, San Francisco 



m 



LATEST UNITED STATES REAPPRAISEMENTS 
OF GERMAN IMPORTS. 

25016- Silks.— From Otto Boessneck & Co.. Glauchau. 
019— Mfr. Metal —From Fichtel & Sachs. Schweinfurt 
028— Leather Cases, etc— From Philipp Deutsch, Frankfort, 

030— Cameras, etc.— From I C A, Dresden. 

031 — Cameras, etc. — From I C A, Dresden. 

033— Toys.— From F. W. Mailer jr., Berlin. 

034— Cotton Yam. — From P. Kunfermann, Krefeld. 

035 — Bronze Powder. — From Metallpapier-Bronrefarben-Blatt- 

[metallwerke, Munich. 

047 — Artificial Silk Fabrics.— From Gustav Jacobiny, Crefeld. 

048— Artificial Silk Fabrics. — From Gebr. Schaub. Viersen. 

049— Artificial Silk Fabrics — From Gebr. Schaub, Viersen. 

050 — Demijohns. — From Gebrilder Stoevesandt, Rinteln. 
052 — Cotton Velvet.— From M. Maugers & Sohne, Berlin, 
056 — Beaded Articles. — From Emil Hein, Eibenstock. 

063 — Music Wire. — From Felten & Guilleaume CarlswerkeA.-G., 

[Mulheim. 

066 — Mfr. Flax. — From Regenhat & Raymann, Freiwalden. 

067 — Enameled Ware. — From Eisenhutte Silesia, Berlin. 

068 — Aluminum Ware. — From Aluminum Friedenberg, Berlin. 

071 — Enameled Ware.— From E. F. Beeger, Schwarzenberg. 

072 — Enameled Ware, etc. — From Emaillierwerke Lauter and 

[Ernst A. Hecker, Berlin. 

073— Blank Books. — From Kirchner & Co., Barmen. 

081 — Manufactured Cotton.— From Heinrich Hoh, Peterswalden. 

084— Decorated China.— From Heinrich Winterling, Berlin, 

085— Decorated Earthenware.— From Villeroy & Booh, Berlin. 
092 — Ink.— From Siegwerk Chem. Laboratorium, Siegburg. 
095— Cutlery.— From Gebr. Schmacbtenberg, Solingen. 
109— Toys.— From Ernst Paul Lehmann, Brandenburg. 

112— Oxygen Cylinders. — From Mannesmannrohren - Werke, 

[Diisseldorf. 

113— Paper. — From Brangs & Heinrich, Solingen. 

114— Paper.— From Brangs & Heinrich, Solingen. 
117— White China. — From Galluba & Hoffmann, Berlin. 
121— Bronze Powder.— From Georg Schorr & Co., Nurnberg. 
123— Nitrate of Yttrium.— From Dr. O. Knofler & Co., PlOtzensee. 

137— Toys —From Julius Rudert. Hamburg. 

138— Slate Pencils —From Erste Thur Griffahl, Sonneberg. 
144— Manufactured Metal.— From Herm. Oschatz, Gispersliben. 
148- Decorated China.— From Heinrich Winterling, Berlin. 



4' 




ALL-STEEL UP-TO-DATE OFFICE FURNITURE 

SHOULD BE USED IN EVERY OFFICE 

FIREPROOF, DURABLE, CONVENIENT 

ASK FOR MY BOOKLET 

EUGEN ZIMMERMANN, BERLIN 

61 FRIEDRICH-STRASSE 61 



TRANSATLANTIC AND PACIFIC REMOVALS 

LARGEST AND OLDEST LIFT VAN COMPANY OF EUROPE 

MODERN FIREPROOF STORAGE WAREHOUSE 
A. B. C. AND LIEBERS CODE 

W. A. C. KEIM, HAMBURG, PLAN 7-9, ECKE RATHAUSMARKT 

CABLE ADDRESS: "SPEDITIOaSHAUS HAiBURQ" 



Eiubliahed 1840. 




C. p. Eccardt & Co., Kloster-Kellerei 

Court-Purveyors, Bankers, Kreuznach, Rhineland, Germany. 

Wine Growers & Shippers of German Winee 
Rhine, Moselle, Nahe & Pfalz. 

Still & Sparkling -f White & Red -f in Bottles & in Wood. 
Large Export to the U. S. since 1865. 

U.S. Branch: C. F. Eccardt & Co., 77 Broad Street, New York. 

Telegrams ; Eccardt Kreuinach - Eccardt Neo York, ABC Code IV& V. 



TWO LEADING HOTELS 



BERLIN 

ATLANTIC 

KAISERHOF 



HAMBURG 
ATLANTIC 

PFORDTE 



DRESDEN. 



High ClassFamily House &Boarding Establishment 
Quietly situated within easy reach of Central 
Station. Home of prominent Cosmopolitans. 



Westminster 



APARTMENTS and Single Rooms with 
Private Bath and Toilet. Hot and Cold 
Water m every Room. Magnificent Hall. 
Moderate Terms. F. Kuhn, Court Purveyor. 



Hotel 



DRESDEN.*. ESPLANADE 

NEWLY BUILT UP-TO-DATE FIRST CLASS FAMILY HOUSE AND 
BOARDING ESTABLISHMENT. 

nnL^l"*" ^^^^ RUNNING WATER IN EVERY BED ROOM 
ROOMS AND SEPARATE SUITES WITH BATH AND LAVATORIES. 

SPACIOUS LOUNGE AND TEA-ROOM. 

DRESDEN-A. F. BALBIAN, prop. 



MtlNCHNER STR. 1 u. 1 b! 



FORMERLY MOTEL NEW YORK. 



American 

Association of Commerce and Trade 

FOUNDED 1903. OFFICES EQUITABLE BUILDING, TRIEDRIOHSTR. 69/flO. 



BULLETIN 

ISSUED MONTHLY 
VOL. XU. BERLIN, NOVEMBER, 1914. No. ». 



THE TWELFTH ANNUAL^GENERAL MEETING. 

Members are informed that the Twelfth Annual Meeting 
for the election of Officers and Directors will be held Saturday 
Eyening November 28, 1914 at eigh» o'clock sharp at the 
rooms of the Association Friedrichstrasse 59 — CO. A full atten- 
dance is requested. A buffet lunch will be provided. 

The following gentlemen have been nominated bj the 
Kominating Committee: 

For President I. Wolf, jr. 

First Vice-President W. A. Derrick 

Second Vice-President . . . . M. C. McCann 

Third Vice-President L. Ph. Witzleben 

Treasurer Richard Siering 

Directors for Two Years: 

Maximilian Mintz 
G. H. Wark 
Dr. G. A, Kubler 
Paul Koning 

Justizrat Dr. Victor Schneider. 



- w — 



FOREIGN SALES AND THE WAR. 

New York. Sept 21, 1914.— Prior to the European war orden 
for merchandise were placed abroad for shipments to New York 
during the month of August. Between sellers and buyers there 
is no dispute as to the fact that shipments cannot be made due 
to conditions arising out of the European war, but question* 
arising are: 

1. Has the seller the privilege to cancel orders placed, and. 
If so, is seller required to give notice of cancellation? 

2. Has the buyer the privilege to cancel order placed, and. 
if 50 is the buyer required to give notice of cancellation? 

3. Has the seller, without notification of any kind, the optioa 
of shipping the orders after the war is over although the time 
of shipment, according to contract, has expired, or, to give notice 
after the war is over that the orders have been cancelled? 
Orders placed abroad prior to the war and that cannot be shipped 
during contract time on account of the war. Do such orders be- 
come automatically cancelled? 

DAILY SUBSCRIBER. 

Reply.— 1. There is nothing in our correspondent's state- 
ment of this case to show that the seUer has a right to cancei 
these orders. I! he have such right he would probably be re- 
quired to give notice of canceUation. though we cannot be quite 
sure of that unless we know what there is in the contract givinff 
him a right to cancel in any event. 

2. The buyer, so far as we are informed, has no riiyht to 
cancel the order. ° 

3. The time of shipment is fixed in this case. It is the time 
named in the contract, if any; if no time is therein named, then 
shipment is to be made in a reasonable time. If. for any reason 
(whether through the fault of the seller or not) shipment be not 
made in a reasonable time, the contract is at end. Wars have 
been known to last for 8 years and for 30 years; and a contract 
does not remam in abeyance, tiU the war is over. A contract 
must be performed at the proper time or acceptance of perfor- 
mance cannot be compelled 

JOURNAL OF COMMERCE. 



GREAT BRITAIN AND CONTRABAND. 
We quote the following timely remarks from Bradstreet's: 
rr«,f1^"!''-*^'-''"'''°" ^^''^"8^ respecting the attituda of 

St?ti w 'T'^ ^° shipments of foodstuffs from the United 
.!T ■ , the British ambassador at Washington has 

authorued the announcement that his government intends to revise 
Itandlnrr" ^''^^ardrng contraband. In the meantime, an under- 
standmg has been reached with the State Department under 
which goods,_such as foodstuffs, consigned to Hc^land In neutral 

l\Sd an 'L'f P''' '° "^^'"'^ Netheriands government has 
placed an embargo on exportations, will not be treated as 



- •» - 



^^^f' 4 ^ understood that this arrangement i. !n oart 

Dn ch border. A different course has bien foUowed by 
»h.vf r^'T'^u^' *° »«nie shipments of copper 

bin H.? -"^H f'^'PP«^J''«'n United States to Holland have 
^JTT^'^ ''^^e intended for a K 

armament concern in Germany. The full value of the carlo^ 

Briti,hTT' '''"'^'^ American shippers 

T HV ' ^''^ ^^^^''^^ intended to be 

treated as conditional contraband, unwrought copper lead 

ISels S^Tular h 5P°r'^«" Germany in American 

WILL GERMANY LOSE SHIPS AS WAR PRIZES? 
The war's effect on the maritime standing of the warrinjr 
power, depends largely on the attitude ol thi prixe courts of 
Angiand and Germany, 

^® ?'"?"!5'^ Co"»'t. ««t>ng at London under the 

pidance of Sir Samuel Evans, has shown a dispostion to refrain 
from condemning merchant vessels seized in BriUsh harbors at 
the outbreak of hostilities It will be recalled that on August 4 
r« ^""^ '^f'^ Germany that a state of war was in 
«tect Sir Edward Grey sent telegrams to both Berlin and 
Vienna asking whether Germany and Austria would give consent 
»o a period of grace in which to allow the shipping of the three 
nations to depart from enemy ports, and that they be given 
passes providing for their voyage unmolested to a home port. 

Austria entered into such an arrangement with England 
with the result that ships flying the Austrian flag which were 
seised by England were later released and aUowed to proceed 
lo Austrian ports. Germany, however, did not reply to England's 
inquiry and her faihire to do so has caused much confusion in 
the administration of priae court procedure. 

Sir Samuel Evans, in the first case which came before him, 
that of the sailing vessel Chile, which was seized in the harbor 
of Cardiff— decided that in view of Germany's failure to enter 
into an arrangement for the release of British vessels held under 
similar circumstances to the Chile, the Chile properly belonged to 
the Crown, but that he would not condemn the vessel and would 
Issue an order for its detention, final adjudication pending the 
receipt of official advices as to Germany's dispostion of British 
▼essels which were seized in German ports. 

The question arises, would it be more profitable for Germany 
»o relinquish all future cbim on the 894 German vessels held by 



— 58 - 



England, hoping that the Britisch vessels now German prizes 
will more than compensate the nation at large. For a time it 
was believed that Germany held almost 1000 British vessels in 
Hamburg and Bremen, but this theory is dispelled by the fact 
that not more than 4000 foreign vessels entered either Hamburg 
or Bremen during the course of a year. 

It is therefore behaved that should England continue to 
show a disposition to maintain its attitude to release German 
vessels seized contrary to Article II of The Hague Conference, 
which is binding on both Germany and England, Germany will 
at some later time indicate that it wUl release all British mercantile 
vessels now held in its ports. 

In reference to the release of neutral cargo in German 
Steamers which have been captured or seized, England has already 
mdicated that it would facilitate the release of such cargo. A 
special commission was appointed to deal with cargoes of grain 
consigned to Germany in British ships which were diverted to 
English ports. These cargoes are being sold in England and the 
American shippers are being paid. 

The naval prize court at London has freed shipments of 
various commodities on German steamers which are still awaiting- 
hearing by the prize court. The goat skins on the Ger^nan 
steamer Schneefels, held at Gibraltar, have been relased while 
word was received this week that a shipment of brewers' grains 
on the steamer Prinz Adalbert, which is held by England at 
London, was also released. 

It is apparent that the administration of prize court procedure 
Will occupy the attention of English authorities for many years 
to come. The laws affecting the disposition of prizes of war 
have never been tested. Since the Crimean war England has 
not had a prize court in session, and while the rules governinff 
the procedure were revised a short time before the outbreak of 
hositihties, Sir Samuel Evans, president of the prize court, has 
indicated that the decisions now being handed down, hSns of 
significant importance, must necessarily be carefuUy considered 

taken °^ ^'^'^ht. dock dues for vessels 

taken into ports after being captured, tke payment of charges oa 
vessels which were seized in British ports and a host of^?thi 
miportant questions will tax the prize court, and each deciS 

^lii gr cio^^^i':. ^"^'^ ''"^"-'''y -''^ 

Journal of Commerce, New York. 

BOYCOTT OF AMERICAN GOODS IN GERMANY. 

th;.t tJlr^^"'"^ ^'^""^^^ *° attention of our Association 

that there was a disposition to boycott American goods in G^ 
many, we immediately took steps to in vestigate thfs rnatter and 
communicated with the press as well as various Chambis ot 
Commerce and other commercial organisations in Germany We 
are, however, pleased to say that we received very favorable 



— 53 — 



repl,^ from the various bodies in the following cities- Berlin 
Freiburg, B.. Du.sburg, Leipzig, Zittau, Wiesbaden. Regensbur;' 
Bonn, Stuttgart and Chemnitz, and quote herewith the rS 
received from the Handelskammern Frankfurt a. M/and CheSt? 
and also the Potsdamer Handelskammer in Berlin : 

Handelskammer (Translations) 
zu Frankfurt a. M. October 23, 1914. 

hnv.n5!"orA""^ ''^I''^^' '■^'^^"''y •■^^^•^^d from you regarding 

boycott of Amencan products, we would say that no such tendencf 
has come to our notice, and we do not believe that the idea of 
boycotting American goods would meet with any support in 
German business circles. . . ^ auppuri m 

;ind Jf/ ''^^^ ^"""'■^ '"^'^^o^^'-- that Germany's commerce 

and trade and we especially, lay great stress upon developing 
and strengthening the trade relations with your country wf 
would, therefore, warmly welcome any efforts on your part to 
tV.Tf /'f^""°"r °^ y"^' '^°""'ry'»en and especially the press, 
the friendly feeling of the German nation towards them. In oui^ 
opinion a great deal could be achieved towards this end if 
through your influence fairer judgment would be passed upon 
Germany by the American People, thus paving the way for the 
conviction that all rumours pertaining to unfriendly action on 
the part of Germany towards America, are to be received with 
distrust and must be considered as malevolent lies on the part 
of our enemies. ,o- , 

(Signature.) 

Handelskammer 
zu Chemnitz. October 14, 1914. 

, In answer to the circular received to day from vou con- 
cerning boycott of American products, we would say that in our 
district there is no thought of boycotting American goods and 
that we have not observed any such tendency among the trade 
or the pubUc of this district. On the contrary, the connections 
existing here with the United States are especially vigorous and 
close, and will continue to be so. (Signature ) 

Potsdamer Handelskammer, /-x, . , 

Sitz Berlin. 13' 
We thank you for sending us your circular "Boycott of 
American Products" and beg to inform you that we are quite in 
sympathy with the sentiments expressed therein, and that we 
would be happy if the present war would not produce any 
disturbing influence on the commercial relations between your 
and our country. Indeed, there is absolutely no reason for such, 
as the trade of both countries is dependent upon mutual exchange. 

There can be no question as to boycotting products of neutral 
countries especially the United States, and this never was the 

(Signature.) 

The letters from the other Chambers of Commerce were 
without exception to the same effect. 



- M - 



THE AMERICAN BUSINESS WORLD AND PRESENT 
CONDITIONS IN GERMANY. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the American 
Association of Commerce and Trade it wa« resolved to send the 
Secretary of the Association, Mr. George S. Atwood, to the 
United States, to enlighten American business circles as to the 
actual commercial and economical conditions now prevailing ia 
Germany. Mr. Atwood will visit most of the largest commercial 
and industrial centres in the United States and will lecture before 
the members of large commercial corporations in each city, such 
as the Chamber of Commerce of the United States in Washington, 
the National Association of Manufacturers in New York, etc. 

Mr. Atwood will lay special stress upon giving a clear 
impression of Germany's standing; his statements will be 
based upon official statictics treating with Germany's harvest, the 
meat supply, present market prices, the natural resources of the 
country, and the production in the various branches of industry, 
the standing of the Reichsbank, the Kriegs-Kreditbank and the 
German War Loan. He will have his lectures published by the 
Prcse in each city. 



LETTERS TO AMERICA. 

Letters written in English or German can be handed In at 
the PrufungssteUe. Postamt 17, Schlesischer Bahnhof. accompanied 
w>th a certificate of the Berliner Handelskammer. All letter* 
must be presented at the PrufungssteUe open, and after examl- 
nation by the officer in charge can be closed in the presence of 
K ^ despatched from there to their destination 

by the shortest route. Mail written in English should be handed 
in on Mondays. Mednesdays and Fridays; German letters every 
day from >/• past nine to 1 o'clock and from Vi past 4 to 



WAR RISK INSURANCE. 
[Public No. 193, 63 d Congress— S. 6357.] 
AK ACT To authorise the eetablishment of • Bureau of War Bisk 
Insurance in the Treasury Department. 

^I!!,' !f commerce of the United States is now greatly 
m^fi through the absence of adequa^fad- 

l^n.» -'u'"'."*^* American vessels and thek cargoee 
against the nsks of war; and '* 



^ff" L ^**"««* necessary and expedient that the United 
btate. shall temporarily provide for the export shipping trade 
of the United States adequate facilities for the insurance of its 
commerce against the risks of war: Therefore 

/i.w/''vTc^^^ 1^^. ^^'^^^ ""(l House of Representatives 
of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That 
there is esUblished in the Treasury Department a bureau to be 
known as the Bureau of War Risk Insurance, the director of 
which shall be entitled to a salary at the rate of $ 5.000 
per annum. 

SEC. 2. That the said Bureau of War Risk Insurance, sub- 
ject to the general direction of the Secretary of the Treasury 
shall as soon as practicable, make provisions for the insurance by 
the United States of American vessels, their freight and passage 
moneys, and cargoes shipped or to be shipped therein, against 
loss or damage by the risks of war, whenever it shall appear to 
the Secretary that American vessels, shippers, or importers io 
American vessels are unable in any trade to secure adequate war 
risk insurance on reasonable terms. 

SEC. 3. That the Bureau of War Risk Insurance, with the 
approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, is hereby authorized 
to adopt and publish a form of war risk policy, and to fix reas- 
onable rates of premium for the insurance of American vessels, 
their freight and passage moneys and cargoes against war risks, 
which rates shall be subject to such change, to each port and for 
each class, as the Secretary shall find may be required by the 
circumstances. The proceeds of the aforesaid premiums when re- 
ceived shall be covered into the Treasury of the United States. 

SEC. 4. That the Bureau of War Risk Insurance, with the 
approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, shall havs power to 
make any and all rules and regulations necessary for carrying 
out the purposes of this Act. 

SEC. 5. That the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized 
to establish an advisory board, to consist of three members skilled 
in the practices of war risk insurance, for the purpose of assisting 
the Bureau of War Risk Insurance in fixing rates of premium 
and in adjustment of claims for losses, and generally in carrying 
out the purposes of this Act; the compensation of the members 
of said board to be determined by the Secretary of the Treasury, 
but not to exceed $ 25 a day each, while actually employed. In 
the event of disagreement as to the claim for losses, or amount 
thereof, between the said bureau and the parties to such contract 
of insurance, an action on the claim may be brought against the 
United States In the District Court of the United States, sitting 
in admiralty, in the district in which the claimant or his agent 
may reside. 

SEC. (J. That the Director of the Bureau of War Risk In- 
surance, upon the adjustment of any claims for losses in respect 
of which no action shall have been begun, shall, on approvsd of 
the Secretary of the Treasury, promptly pay such claim for losse* 



- 56 - 



to the party in interest; and the Secretary of the Treasury is 
directed to make provision for the speedy adjustment of claims 
for losses and also for the prompt notification of parties in intere^ 
of the decisions of the bureau on their claims. 

SEC. 7. That for the purpose of paying losses accruing 
under the provisions of this Act there is hereby appropriated 
out of any money in the Treasury of the United States not 
otherwise appropriated, the sum of $ 5,000,000. 

SEC. 8. That there is hereby appropriated, for the purpose 
of defraying the expenses of the establishment and maintenance 
of the Bureau of War Risk Insurance, including the payment of 
salaries herein authorized and other personal services in the District 
of Columbia, out of any money in the Treasury of the United States 
not otherwise appropriated, the sum of $ 100,000. 

SEC. 9 That the President is authorized, whenever, in his 
judgment, the necessity of further war insurance by the United 

fhis Ant ? "'"'^'^ '°u'^''' '° ""^P^"d operations of 

this Act in so far as it authorizes insurance by the United States 

bfmfdi"?/'' ^'"^'^^ ^^."^'^^ ^1^='=^ suspension hal 

Art h ; lir^ y^^" ^^ter the passage of this 

Act, but shall not affect any insurance outstanding at the time 
or any claims pending adjustment. For the purpos! of the f iTal 
TwTRii '"'^ ^"^^'-"ding insurance or ci^ims, the Bureau 
ot War Risk Insurance may, in the discretion of the President 
be conunued in existence a further period not exceeding one year 

X.- l^- ^^^^ ^ detailed statement of all expenditurea 
under this Act and of all receipts hereunder shaU be SmS 
to Congress at the beginning of each regular session ^""""'"^ 
itspafsage.^^' '^^^^ ^^'^ ^ct *hall take effect from and after 
Approved, September 2, 1914. 



FINANCIAL CONDITIONS. 

rationrfor'tr'"'"^ ^^"^^"IS^^^'S^ of the sterling exchange ope- 
on M ^^.'"^ delivered demand bills y^terdav morning 
on Monday's an nl cation « at aqrI/. -ru- /^>^^iu<»y morning 
the rate /t ^vWi! ?■ ^-^^ This compares with 4.96V4. 
tne rate at which applications were fiUed on Saturday Thit 
sugges s substantial progress, although no definite deT is vet 
ava lable a^ to the amount of exchange that the commfttee hS 

?ay SdTtrr" ""'^^ exchTgr/est'e^ 

attrihufin / ?^ P°°^ operations was firm, which mav be 



— ^ — 



following morning for allotments. Between these intervals there 
Is obvious y very slight opportunity for large speculative commit- 
ments^of foreign exchange to be created Advices from London 
yesterday stated that £ 1,000,000 in New York Central notes was 
being offered on a 6Va per cent basis. These presumably are 
part of the issue of such notes recently offered here and ai-e 
probably sufficient to meet the maturities that the New York 
Central hues must meet in London at the present time 

The gold pool wUl continue to offer exchange, it is under- 
stood, m sufficient volume to gradually force a reduction of 
sterLng exchange rates towards a point that would have existed 
It conditions were normal. It is not the intention, however, to 
force rates down in an arbitrary manner on a greater scale than 
the situation wiU bear. Aside from the operations of the pool a 
much more comfortable and cheerful feeling seems to be develop- 
mg in foreign exchange circles. Some of the large London banks 
and bankers have cabled their correspondents here that they were 
prepared to extend a moderate volume of credit in the usual 
Yorm. This is a development in the right direction, and now that 
it has once started will necessarily make progress from day to 
day. An additional instalment of gold for New York city obli- 
gations that are maturing abroad is due to-morrow. This sum 
will presumably be forwarded to Ottawa in the form of gold if 
it is not paid by the members of the syndicate in the form of 
exchange on London. journal of Commerce, New York. 



NO LIMIT ON TRADE WITH BELLIGERENTS. 

Washington, October 14. 

Commercial transactions between the belligerent governments 
of Europe and private citizens of the United States in no way 
affect the neutrality of this country, even if arms and ammunition 
are involved, according to a statement issued to-day by Robert 
Lansinf, acting Secretary of State. Mr. Lansing says that he 
was prompted to make the statement by numerous inquiries and 
complaints indicating a widespread impression that American 
business men cannot sell war supplies to the belligerents without 
committing an unneutral act. 

"In the first place," the statement adds, "it should be under- 
stood that, generally speaking, a citizen of the United States can 
sell to a belligerent government or its agent any article of com- 
merce which he pleases. He is not prohibited from doing this 
by any rule of international law, by any treaty publication or by 
any statute of the United States. It makes no difference whether 
the articles sold are exclusively for war purposes, such as fire- 
arms, explosives, etc., or are foodstuflfs, clothing, horses, etc., 
for the use of the army or navy of the belligerent. 

"Furthermore, a neutral government is not compelled by 
international law, by treaty or by statute to prevent those sales 



-a - 



to » beUigerent Such tales, therefore, by AnericaD citixem do 
not in the least affect the neutrality of the United State*. 

"It la true that such articles as those mentioned are con- 
sidered contraband and are, outside the territorial jurisdiction of 
a neutral nation, subject to seizure by an enemy of the purchasing 
goTemment, but it is the enemy's duty to prevent the articles 
reaching their destination, not the duty of the nation whose citizens 
have sold them. If the enemy of the purchasing nation happens 
for the time to be unable to do this that is for him one of the 
misfortunes of war; die inability, however, imposes on the neutral 
government no obligation to prevent the sale. 

"Neither the President nor any executive department of the 
Government possesses the legal authority to interfere in any way 
with trade between the people of this country and the territory of 
a be ligerent. There is no act of Congress conferring such au- 
thority or prohibrting traffic of this sort with Europ^n nations, 
although m the case of neighboring American republics Congress 
has given the President power to proclaim an embargo on arms 

ivil smTe""""'"' ^^"'^ ^' j"''*™^* ''O"^** to Prevent 
"For the Government of the United States itself to sell to a 
"^'"''^ *° unneutral act. but for a private 
L neiS * product of the United'^taJeJ 

» neither unlawful nor unnatural, nor within the power of the 
Executive to prevent or control. ^ 

'ongoing remarks, however, do not apply to the out- 
ISh ' ft'^nishing of vessels in American port, or^ If mSit^ 
expeditions on American soil in aid of a beIHgerent These a^ 
are prohibited by the neutrality laws of the United Stat«.^ 



TO PROTEST AGAINST NEW INVOICE RULES. 
The Ajnerican Importers' AssociaUon, U. S. A Inc at > 

?K^tCn fr.h''^ "'^'^T ^'^'^'^ -end a c^mSee 
ment to^^^il^ > f^'P*"* of '^questing the Treasury Depart- 



reference to the decUraUon to be Wed by the •hipper abroad at 
the time of ahipment (paragraph D. aection m. of the lOlt 
tariff act): 

"That it [the declaration] contalnt, If the merchandige vai 
obtained by purchase, or agreement for purchase, a true and full 
•tatement of the tune when, the place where, the person from whom 
the same was purchased, or agreed to be purchased." 

The consular regulations in paragraph 664 change this pro- 
vision, accordmg to Mr. Sharretts. "Instead of requiring the de- 
claration that IS specified and described in the statute with regard 
to merchandise obtained by purchase or agreement for purchase." 
he said, "the proposed regulation requires it in the case of merch- 
andise shipped in pursuance of a purchase or an agreement of 
purchase. The two situations are not the same. Let us assume 
that 'A' is located in the United States and has various foreign 
accounts. He is the agent for certain foreign manufacturers and 
receives a commission on sales made by him in the United States. 
He sends salesmen through the country and they receive orders 
from customers all over the United States. The foreign manu- 
facturers consign goods every week to 'A' so that he can fill the 
orders received by him from his numerous customers, both whole- 
sale and retail. Ordinarily the customers do not know who the 
manufacturers are, and on the odier hand the manufacturers do 
not know who their factor's customers are. When these goods 
are shipped from abroad they will not have been obtained by 
purchase or agreement for purchase. When 'A' receives the 
goods in the United States he obtains them on consignment. He 
does not obtain them by purchase or agreement for purchase. In 
fact, such goods are not obtained by purchase or agreement for 
purchase until the purchaser or party agreeing to purchase so 
obtains them. 

"In the above case 'A' is what is known as a 'factor.' He 
is entrusted with tiie possession, disposal and control of the merch- 
andise and may sell it in his own name and bind the principal. 
The regulations in paragraph 664 seem to confuse the agent or 
factor of the foreign seller with a 'broker.' The functions of the 
two are not the same. The broker is, strictly speaking, the inter- 
mediate negotiator between the seller and purchaser. He sells in 
the name of his principal. He does not have possession, disposal 
or control of the merchandise. The factor, on the contrary, sells 
in his own name and has possession, disposal and control of the 
merchandise." 

Following the discussion of the Treasury ruling the pro- 
posed by-laws of the association were read. They were adopted 
with the understanding that the organization committee was to 
make a few minor changes in language. 

Henry D. Cooper, president of the association, acted as 
chairman of the meeting. 



- «0 — 



THE AMERICAN RELIEF KITCHEN. 

The Relief Kitchen which we reported in our Bulletin of 
Uctober was formally opened on October 19 th 1914. 

Herr Robert Guthmann, a leading citizen of Berlin, kindly 
M^^L'^'fP^'"' i'^" ""^""'Se the "Villa" at Schlesische 
Strasse No. 26 (situated in the laboring districts of the city) 
fitted with large spacious rooms, well ventilated, with large modern 
kitchen and modern equipments, especially suited for the purpose 

meal Sv^^' °^ this ■•Relief Kitchen" is to give a wholesome 
meal daily to as many distressed persons as the fund will permit. 

The food is specially prepared by the "Volks-Kaffee- und 
fsoT'jor th";''"'^''''^'^;' ^" organization founded in 

TTie menn U P"'T^°^%°f .f PPlyi"g food to the poorer classes. 

b'i:drscirntrrTeLt'^' "'^-'^^--^ 

which^maki^^fr'^' Frauendienst", a charitable organization. 
Stribute^h^M 1 investigation has kindly consented to 

ot ten, each Committee serving weekly. ^^"lunueea. 
The Patrons of the American Relief Kitchen are- 
His Excellency the Honorable James W. Gerard, American 

Ambassador, and Mrs. Gerard- 
Consul- General Julius G. Lay and Mrs.' Lay 

meal daily we are annLlfn f . ^ P^°P'^ ^ ^ood square 

increase this number ^ *° ^""'""^ ^"'^ ^""ds to 

A Contribution of 
10 wUl enable us to serve another 25 meals 

100 ,. 
200 „ 
600 „ 
1000 „ 

Relief^SS?"M^°j"'VSoV° the Treasurer of the American 
ciation of Commerce and fiT' ^^'f °l American Asso- 
^ommerce and Trade, Berlin, Friedrichstrasse 59-60. 



Mk. 



" »» ** 


50 , 


" >t »» 


125 , 


" " ft 


250 „ 


'» •» it 


500 „ 


»» » )» 


1250 „ 


" »> )» 


2500 „ 



AMERICAN EXPORTS. 

of August 1914. The imnortt thl '""^ ^^'^ """'^ 

Dollars in Septen^ber, a^'^o^^'J: J^^^^ iT^iSr uTu".s? 
import "w'Jf m .TlCVoUafs"^"^' "^^^ n.aiionl)"S. and the 

over impo^rts wt^5"°in°VolLr"'"' '^-^ '^^''^ °' 

Dollars in 1913. Dollars, as compared with 406 million 

for » Tafue'T about ^80^00^° DoTrs"\" ^''Z 
bales for a value of 6-) ^niliiTn ?i •• *o ''"mpa'-ed with 930 million 
value 01 b5 million Dollars m September of the previous year. 

RECENT UNITED STATES TREASURY DECISIONS. 
(T. D. 34650-Q. A. 7586.) 
American goods returned. 
COMPLIANCE WITH REGULATIONS-"FILED WITH ENTRY" 
of 190^ tlaV hrrh^^r7edam!i'n^^\he''°^ Customs Regulations 

(T. D. 34666-G. A. 7589.) 
Finality of board's decision. 

^' ipPRAIsS^^^ ^^^'^^3 GENERAL 

TTn,-f«jQf".^^*n"°° ^' ^"^^ °' 1909- the Board of 

United States General Appraisers, in the trial and determination of issuei 
arising under the tariff law, is created a court in everything but name-a 
court of limited jurisdiction, but within that jurisdiction its power" 
are made as ample as those of the United States Circuit Court. 

2. FINALITY OP BOARD'S DECISION. 

The decisions of the Board of United State* General Appraisers 
m cases where it has jurisdiction of the subject matter and the perions" 
are not only final and conclusive, not only presumed to be correct but 
are absolutely verity when the same have not been appealed from in 
the manner prescribed by law, and are to be treated as such in any 
coUateral proceeding. Voorhees et al. v. United States Bank (10 Pet. 449) 
It must be presumed by every court that when the board renders a 
decision with reference to the classification of merchandise it does so 
upon ample proof and the conclusion reached must stand as the law 
and the accepted as such unless appealed from and reserved in the 
manner prescribed by law. HUton's Administrators v. Jones 
(159 U. S., 584). 

3. CREDENCE TO BE GIVEN THE BOARD'S DECISION. 

By subsection 14 of section 28, tariff act of 1909, the decision of the 
Board of United States General Appraisers in classification cases, -when 
acting within its jurisdiction, is made final and conclusive upon all 
persons interested, except in cases appealed to the United Statea 
Court of Customs Appeals in the manner provided by law. 



▼I 



INQUIRIES. 

(Readers of the "Bulletin" will please take notice that further 
information about subjects under tJiis heading is always to be had npoa 
application to the Secretary o( the Association.) 

4. Well-to-do American business man, member of the Association, 
residing in Berlin for some years thoroughly familiar with trade 
conditions and well acquainted with the most important business 
houses throughout Germany, solicits the representation for some 
good article. Highest commercial and bank references, can 
abo furnish bond or security. 

6. Young English woman, of long experience and expert stenogra- 
pher in English, German and French and who has been engaged 
in government service, would like position with American firm. 

6. Export nach den U. S. A. 

in Artikeln der Metallindustrie. Hamburger Importeur mit vielen 
Beziehungen in Nord- Amerika. ist bereit, sich ftir leistungs- 
fahige Fabriken zwecks Anbahnung von Beziehungen zu be- 
tatigen, gegen entsprechenden Reisezuschufi und Provision. 

9. Energetic New Yorker, wishesGerman concerns, which would 
hke to be represented in the United States, to communicate with 
him givmg fuU particulars. Apply W. B. 132 care of this paper. 

14. Well established manufacturers' Agents in BerUn covering all 
Europe, open to new agencies for gents and ladies' furnishings. 

15. American, member of the Association, open to agencies of 
American firms. 

18. American, has had eleven years of general office experience 
four m the mercantile and seven in the financial line, English 
correspondent, speaks German, highly recommended desires 
posiUon, temporary or permanent, part time or entire day. 

American, speaking German and French, seeks good agencv 
Best references. s 



19, 
20, 

21. 



American manufacturers, desiring to enter the German market 
successfully, wiU find it to their advantage to communicate with 
American business man residing in Beriin, whose reputation in 
introducing American products is established. 

Young American, speaking German, graduate University Penn- 
sylvania, wishes secretarial or clerical position. 



vn 



NO SNAIL'S PACE in offices and counting houses whsre the 

UNDERWOOD 

Writing- and Adding-Machine 

is »t work. — The typewriter for speed and accuracy. 

"The machine you will eventually buy" 

Particulars from 

J. MUGGLI, Berlin W 8, [^.rrrM 




Ask the 

American Association of Commerce and Trade 

for information regarding trade with Germany I 

The American Association of Commerce and Trade is the 
only American Chamber of Commerce In Germany, founded 
by Americans and carried on by Americans. 



BELLEVUE PHARMACY 

ALL AMERICAN AND ENGLISH SPECIALTIES 
PRESCRIPTIONS IN ENGLISH CAREFULLY PREPARED 

BERLIN, POTSDAMER PLATZ 

TELEPHONE: LUTZOW 198. TELEPHONE LUTZOW 198 



HOTEL ESPLANADE 

BERLIN HAMBURG 



R. F. DOWNING & CO. 

Established 1856 NEW YORK CITY 45 &. 47 Pearl Street 
Merchandise Forwarders and Customs Brokers. 

Are prepared to receive and deliver goods to any part of the United States and Canada. 
Duty paid by special arrangement and goods delivered free of all charges. 
Accounts collected and remittances promptly made. 
K. F. Downing & Co. will gladly furnish information on all shipping and customs matters. 




THE "SMITH PREMIER" 

owing to its "complete Keyboard" is THE typewriter 
for Germany and the German language with its 
abundant use of capital letters. 

Ask us why? 

"Smith Premier Typewriter Co." 

6a Fritdrich - Straise, Berlin (Showroom Jt Copyiag office) 
75 PoUdamer Straste (Executive offices^ 



VI II 



GEBRUEDER MOSSE 

«7/A8 JAE6ERSTRASSE, BERLIN. 19 W. 45th STREET, NEW-YORK. 

8Y APPOINTMENT TO THE SERM*N IMPERIAL COIWT. 

GENTLEMEN 'S FURNISHINGS. 

IN EXCLUSIVE STYLES. NOT FOUND ELSEWHERE. 
SHIRTS, HANOKERCMIEFS, CRAVATS, SOCKS, UNDERWEAR. 



DRESDEN 

THE SENDI6 HOTELS 

IN DRESDEN AND SCHANDAU 



C. H. HUBERICH 

of th« Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States 

Attorney and Counsellor at law 

BERLIN HAMBURG PARIS ROTTERDAM 

39, Uattr den LImdtn II, Or. Bunla/i 4, rat It PtletUi 61, LeurtAareji 

Cable address: (all offices) AMERILAW. W. U.. ABC, and Lieber'. Codes 

Ask the 

American Association of Commerce and Trade 

for information regarding trade with Germanyl 

The American Association of Commerce and Trade is the 
only American Chamber of Commerce in Germany, founded 
by Americans in 1903 and carried on by Americans. 



Fine Stationery a Specialty 

ROB. WINCKELMANN 

BY APPOINTMENT TO THE COURT 

Berlin C. 19, Hausvoifteiplatz 11 a 

FINE PRINTING LITHOGRAPHY 



THE VERA AMERICAN SHOE 

made by RICE & HUTCHINS, BOSTON, Mass. U. S. A. 
Salesrooms and General Offices for Europe 

f74 FRIEDRICH-STRASSE 1J4. 

Printera: Vercmigt* Knustanotalteo J. BarKoo SOhne Naohf., Berlia S.«. 



Special facilities for (ransportalionof machinery, ironware etc.loQermaiiyand Russia. 
Througfi rales quoted including freight, duty and all charges. For full 
information apply to 

JOSEPH SPIERO & CO. 

17, Battery Place - New York 

or to their General Representatives in: Berlin, Wikinger Ufer 1; Hamburg Frei- 
hof; Konigsberg, Insel Venedig 3; Leipzig, Frankfurter Str. 29; Russian frontier 
agencies at Eydtkuhnen, Prostken, Illowo, Thorn, Skalmierzyce, Brody, 

Podwoloczyska.